NIJC Staff

Heartland Alliance's National Immigrant Justice Center's staff is composed of dedicated human rights activists from a broad range of advocacy and legal backgrounds. Our legal services staff includes licensed attorneys, paralegals, and Board of Immigration Appeals-accredited representatives.

Staff members can be contacted by email using the following format: [first initial][last name]@heartlandalliance.org.

Cindy Agustin is the outreach coordinator and works with the Immigrant Legal Defense Project. Before joining NIJC, she was a youth organizer at the Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights, where she worked with undocumented youth, families, and staff in high schools and universities on issues of college access, deferred action, and undocumented immigrants' rights. She graduated from the University of Chicago in 2011 with a bachelor's degree in comparative human development and a minor in human rights.

Rocío Alcántar is a supervising attorney for NIJC’s Access to Counsel Project, a new initiative of the Immigrant Legal Defense Project. She previously worked as a supervising attorney with the Immigrant Children’s Protection Project and as the lead staff attorney for the Counter-Trafficking Project. Before joining NIJC, Rocío interned with the Legal Assistance Foundation of Metropolitan Chicago and the Inter-American Court of Human Rights in San José, Costa Rica. While a law student she participated in the Asylum and Immigration Law Clinic and was a Sullivan Human Rights Fellow for the International Human Rights Institute at DePaul University College of Law. She received her J.D. from DePaul University College of Law, and her B.A. from the University of Chicago.

Michele Amatangelo is the resource development director. Michele previously served as a Sudan Program manager at USAID's Office of Transition Initiatives in Washington, D.C. Prior to USAID, she spent a number of years in the private sector and also served as an economic development volunteer in the Peace Corps in Honduras. She received a bachelor of science in finance from Boston College and an master's of science in foreign service with a certificate in refugee and humanitarian emergencies from Georgetown University.

Seth Ashton is a staff attorney with the Immigrant Legal Defense Project and assists individuals in immigration proceedings through NIJC’s Help Desk. He previously worked for two years as a paralegal with NIJC's LGBT Immigrant Rights Initiative while attending Chicago-Kent College of Law. Seth received undergraduate degrees from the University of Utah in International Studies and Spanish.

Saba Baig is a supervising attorney with the Immigrant Legal Defense Project. Prior to joining NIJC, Saba worked as a staff attorney for the Battered Immigrant Project at Legal Aid of North Carolina and as an AmeriCorps VISTA Attorney at the Legal Assistance Foundation, representing immigrant victims of crimes. While in law school, she interned at the Chicago Legal Clinic and was a PILI intern at Legal Assistance Foundation. She is a graduate of the University of Iowa College of Law and Amherst College. She is licensed in the state of Illinois.

Kate Banner is NIJC’s Detention Project Coordinator. Kate graduated from University of Exeter in 2011 with an M.A. in Critical Global Politics awarded with distinction. Using the UK as a case study, her postgraduate research examined the growing trend of administrative detention of non-citizens in the post-9/11 political context. Before joining NIJC, Kate worked with Open Society Foundations and the Refugee Therapy Centre in London, as well as Casa Latina and Refugee Women’s Alliance in Seattle, Washington.

Maria Blumenfeld is a Justice AmeriCorps fellow working with NIJC's Asylum Project. She provides legal representation to unaccompanied immigrant children. Maria graduated from Purdue University with a bachelor's of science in business and was a member of the International Honor Society in business, management and administration. She obtained her J.D. from Valparaiso University Law School and is licensed in the state of Indiana. Prior to joining NIJC, she participated in the Valparaiso Immigration Clinic where she represented asylum seekers and served as an interpreter for Special Immigrant Juvenile Status cases.

Gianna Borroto is a staff attorney with NIJC's Immigrant Children's Protection Project and Immigrant Legal Defense Project. She graduated from the University of Florida with a bachelor's of science in psychology. Gianna obtained her J.D. from Harvard Law School and is licensed in the state of Illinois. Prior to joining NIJC, she interned at Legal Services: NYC and the Department of Justice. She also participated in Harvard’s Immigration and Refugee Clinic, where she represented asylum seekers and asylees.

Deborah Capiro is a paralegal working with the Immigrant Children’s Protection Project. She graduated from the University of Chicago with a double major in Political Science and Romance Languages and Literatures. While an undergraduate Deborah interned at the Young Center for Immigrant Children’s Rights in Chicago and the Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services (RAICES) in San Antonio, TX. She received honors for her BA thesis discussing the implementation of best interest standards in the reception and care of migrant children in France. Before coming to NIJC Deborah worked conducting legislative research for David Axelrod’s Institute of Politics.

Erin Carpenter is a paralegal for the Immigrant Children's Defense Project. She graduated from Indiana University Bloomington with a bachelor's degree in Spanish and international studies with a concentration in human rights. During her undergraduate, Erin interned for Congressman Andre Carson and the Indiana Department of Corrections. Erin studied abroad in Argentina, which allowed her to conduct research for her senior capstone thesis on transitional justice in the country after the fall of the dictatorship.

Jennifer Chan is NIJC's associate director of policy. Prior to joining NIJC, Jennifer worked for We Belong Together, a campaign to ensure that women are treated fairly in immigration reform, and OneAmerica, the largest immigrant rights advocacy organization in Washington State. She earned her Master in Public Policy from the University of Chicago’s Harris School of Public Policy. Jennifer holds a bachelor’s degree in anthropology with a minor in human rights from the University of Washington in Seattle, and studied abroad at the Centre Parisien des Etudes Critiques in Paris, France and the Faculty of Law at the Universitet i Bergen in Bergen, Norway.

Vanessa Esparza-López is a supervising attorney with the Immigrant Legal Defense Project, where she provides legal representation to immigrants in administrative applications and removal proceedings. Vanessa previously interned with NIJC in 2008 and 2009. Prior to joining NIJC as a staff attorney, Vanessa practiced immigration law at a private firm. Vanessa is an active member of the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA), where she has volunteered by representing foreign nationals in bond hearings and presenting detained foreign nationals with “Know Your Rights” presentations. She obtained her J.D. from DePaul University College of Law in 2009 and her Bachelor of Arts with honors in International Studies from DePaul University in 2006. During law school, Vanessa was the cofounder of a new student group, the Society for Asylum & Immigration Law. She is licensed in the state of Illinois.

Mark Fleming is the National Litigation Coordinator. Mr. Fleming focuses on strategic litigation and public policy related to immigration enforcement and detention.  NIJC’s work on enforcement issues was recognized with the 2014 Daniel Levy Award of the National Immigration Project. Prior to joining NIJC, Mark was a staff attorney at the Inter-American Commission for Human Rights focused on migrants' rights in the western hemisphere.  In that capacity, he coordinated the Inter-American Commission's investigation into human rights concerns with U.S. immigration enforcement, detention, and due process detention's impact on due process. Mark graduated magna cum laude from Georgetown University Law Center in 2006. While in law school, he worked on a host of immigrants' rights projects, including representing asylum seekers and coordinating a fact-finding mission to Ecuador to investigate the impacts of changes to U.S. immigration law on Colombian refugees.  Mark is licensed by the State of New York. 

Aneesha Gandhi is a staff attorney with NIJC’s LGBT Immigrant Rights Initiative. Prior to joining NIJC, Aneesha was a legal fellow at the Diocese of Kalamazoo, Immigration Assistance Program. During law school she interned for NIJC, the New Orleans Workers’ Center for Racial Justice, and the Greater Boston Legal Services' Immigration Unit. She is holds a B.A. from Smith College and a J.D. from Northeastern University School of Law. Aneesha is licensed in the state of Michigan.

Mary Georgevich is the LGBT project coordinator. Previously she was a paralegal with NIJC's Children’s Project and the Immigrant Legal Defense Project. Mary graduated from Santa Clara University in 2009 with a BS in Political Science and a minor in Arabic, Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies. Prior to NIJC, she was the Field Associate for NETWORK, a National Catholic Social Justice Lobby in Washington, DC, where she educated members on social justice issues that were before Congress and lobbied on Social Security and housing law. Previously, Mary worked as a case manager at Homeboy Industries in Los Angeles, where she mentored former gang members and at-risk youth. She has studied abroad in Granada, Spain and volunteered in Mexico.

Joe Gietl is a staff attorney with the Immigrant Legal Defense Project. Previously, Joe worked at NIJC as a paralegal and BIA Accredited Representative with the VAWA/U Visa Pro Bono Project, the Post-Asylum Benefits & Citizenship Pro Bono Projects, and the Immigrant Children's Protection Project. He also worked in Los Angeles, California, as a non-profit paralegal in the areas of immigration, government benefits, and tenant rights law. Joe received his undergraduate degree in International Affairs from Marquette University and earned his J.D. magna cum laude from Loyola University Chicago School of Law. He is licensed in the state of Illinois.

Audrey Gilliam is a Skadden Fellow and staff attorney for the Counter-Trafficking Project and Immigrant Legal Defense Project. Before joining NIJC, Audrey was a judicial law clerk for the El Paso Immigration Court. During law school, Audrey interned at NIJC, the ACLU of Southern California, the Legal Assistance Foundation, and the Abbott Fund’s Paralegal Aid program in Tanzania. She was also a child advocate for the Young Center. Audrey received her J.D. from the University of Chicago Law School and graduated magna cum laude from Villanova University with a B.A. in sociology and Spanish. She is licensed to practice in Illinois.

Elana Gordon is a paralegal working with NIJC’s Immigrant Children's Protection Project. Elana received her undergraduate degree in 2013 from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in Kinesiology and Spanish. Elana studied abroad in Bilbao, Spain where she worked with immigrant youth from Morocco teaching English and Spanish classes. After graduating college, Elana participated in the Avodah Service Corps, a yearlong AmeriCorps volunteer service program that focuses on fighting the root causes of poverty in the United States.

Anita Gupta is a staff attorney with the Immigrant Legal Defense Project. Anita previously interned with NIJC in 2012 and 2013. Anita obtained her J.D. from DePaul University. During law school, Anita was a Sullivan Human Rights Fellow and participated in the Asylum and Immigration Law Clinic. She was also a PILI intern at the Legal Assistance Foundation. Anita obtained her bachelor’s degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she double majored in International Studies and Political Science.

Megan Helbling is a paralegal with the Immigrant Legal Defense Project. She graduated from North Park University in 2011 with a Bachelor’s of Arts in Spanish and Global Studies. She has traveled to Kosovo and India and studied abroad in Córdoba, Argentina. Prior to joining NIJC, she worked in Queens and Brooklyn, New York, as an immigration counselor and outreach specialist with Catholic Migration Services.

Ashley Huebner is the managing attorney of NIJC's Asylum Project and Immigrant Children's Protection Project. She also chairs the Asylum Committee of the Chicago Chapter of the American Immigration Lawyers Association. Ashley provides training and legal support to pro bono attorneys representing asylum seekers through NIJC and also represents individuals seeking asylum and other immigration relief.  She has been actively involved in litigating asylum cases related to gender-based asylum claims, the particular social group definition, gang-based asylum claims, and the terrorism-related inadmissibility grounds.  Before joining NIJC, she was the judicial law clerk for the Orlando Immigration Court.  Ashley received her B.A. from Marquette University and her J.D. from Boston University School of Law. 

Elizabeth Juarez is the receptionist for NIJC’s office in downtown Chicago. She provides clerical and administrative support services, facilitates scheduling of intake appointments, and manages the reception area.

Molly Keefe is the supervising coordinator of the Immigrant Children’s Protection Project. Prior to joining NIJC, Molly was responsible for resource development and awards management for Save the Children in Nicaragua, and previously worked in fundraising and communications for The Nature Conservancy and the Central American Women’s Fund. Before moving to Central America in 2004, Molly was a BIA-recognized accredited representative at NIJC. Molly is currently completing her master’s degree in public service management at DePaul University.

Lisa Koop, associate director of legal services, directs NIJC's asylum project, handles federal litigation, and provides representation and supervision in deportation defense matters.  Lisa specializes in litigation, policy, and direct services advocacy on behalf of immigrant survivors of gender-based violence. Lisa heads NIJC’s Indiana office and is an adjunct professor at Notre Dame Law School. Lisa graduated magna cum laude from Indiana University McKinney School of Law in 2004.

Hena Mansori is the supervising attorney of the NIJC’s Adult Detention Project. Since joining NIJC in 2008, Hena has represented detained immigrants in removal proceedings before the Immigration Court and Board of Immigration Appeals. Prior to joining NIJC, she interned with the ACLU of Illinois and represented clients in the Immigrant Rights Clinic at New York University School of Law. Hena received her Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from the University of Chicago in 2002 and herJ.D. from NYU School of Law in 2006. She is licensed to practice law in the state of Illinois. 

Catherine Matthews is the litigation project coordinator. Catherine graduated from the University of Richmond in 2011 where she majored in both Spanish and a self-designed global human rights program which culminated in an independent thesis focusing on male victims of sexual and gender-based violence in conflict. Catherine studied abroad in Spain, Argentina, and Kenya, where she researched ethnic interactions and gang violence in the capital’s largest slum. She has also interned with Physicians for Human Rights and volunteered with a refugee family in Richmond, VA.

Mary Meg McCarthy is the executive director of Heartland Alliance’s National Immigrant Justice Center (NIJC), one of the nation’s leading immigrant and human rights advocacy organizations. Under her leadership, NIJC has grown from a staff of eight to 40, serving 10,000 immigrants each year through an unparalleled network of more than 1,000 pro bono attorneys. Through its unique combination of direct service, impact litigation, and advocacy, NIJC promotes due process protections before the U.S. Supreme Court, Congress, and the administration. Under Mary Meg’s leadership, NIJC is a founding member of the Illinois Task Force on Unaccompanied Immigrant Children, the Freedom Network, and the Department of Homeland Security-Nongovernmental Organization Enforcement Working Group, which NIJC currently co-chairs. Recently, NIJC has spearheaded an innovative help desk for immigrants in deportation proceedings as a way to increase access to counsel. Mary Meg has testified before congressional committees on human rights and immigration detention reform. In addition, she is a frequent speaker at national and international conferences on human rights and immigration law and is regularly quoted in leading news outlets such as The New York Times. Mary Meg has provided local, national, and international audiences with chilling evidence of the civil rights abuses that plagued immigrant communities in the immediate aftermath of 9/11 and in the immigrant detention system. She is a current member of the American Bar Association’s Commission on Immigration and the Midwest Coalition for Human Rights steering committee. She is a former member of the Detention Watch Network and the Freedom Network steering committees. Prior to joining NIJC in 1998, Mary Meg practiced civil litigation and served as a pro bono attorney for NIJC’s asylum project. Early in her career, Mary Meg lived in Chile, where she worked in local communities to help safeguard the rights of individuals living under a dictatorship. She is a recipient of numerous awards, including the Pax Christi 2013 Teacher of Peace Award, the Robert Bellarmine Award from Loyola University Chicago School of Law for distinguished alumni, the American Immigration Lawyers Association Chicago Chapter’s Joseph Minsky Mentor Award, Lawyers Trust Fund’s Esther Rothstein Award, and the Federal Bar Association's Sarah T. Hughes Civil Rights Award. 

Monica McCarthy is a paralegal with the Immigrant Legal Defense Project who also supports the coordination of NIJC’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) Pro Bono Project. She was previously a paralegal with NIJC's Immigrant Children's Defense Project. Monica graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2011, where she received a bachelor of arts with distinction in International Studies and Environmental Studies. She studied abroad in Lima, Perú and has traveled throughout South America. Prior to joining NIJC, Monica completed a fellowship with La Fundación Entre Mujeres in Estelí, Nicaragua, where she participated in their rural women’s empowerment, agricultural market development, and ESL projects.

Michaela Muresan is a Justice AmeriCorps fellow with the Asylum Project and represents unaccompanied children in immigration proceedings. She previously worked for the Central American Resource Center (CARECEN) in Washington, DC, and she interned with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, the Immigration Project, and the Legal Assistance Foundation. She received her J.D. from Chicago-Kent College of Law and her B.A. in political science and French from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is licensed to practice in Illinois and in the District of Columbia.

Royce Bernstein Murray is director of policy and is located in NIJC’s Washington, D.C., office. She previously worked as an immigration and human rights law consultant for organizations such as the National Immigration Forum, Immigration Policy Center, the Center for Global Development, and the World Bank’s Nordic Trust Fund. Royce was also an adjunct professor teaching immigration law for five years at the University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law. Prior to consulting and teaching, she worked for the Department of Homeland Security at the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Office of the Chief Counsel, Refugee and Asylum Law Division, and as a Presidential Management Fellow for the Immigration and Naturalization Service Office of International Affairs. Royce began her legal career working with NGOs, including the Lawyers Committee for Human Rights (now “Human Rights First”), the Guatemala Human Rights Commission/USA, and a local immigration clinic, Ayuda. She holds a J.D. from the Georgetown University Law Center and a Bachelor of Arts with distinction in political science from the University of Michigan. She is a member of the New York Bar.

Ross Noecker is a paralegal with the Immigrant Children’s Protection Project. Before coming to NIJC, Ross served as an AmeriCorps volunteer providing college-access support and counseling to high school students in Waukegan, Illinois. He graduated from Grinnell College in 2011 with a bachelor of arts in economics. Ross studied abroad in Buenos Aires, focusing on the history and culture of volunteerism in Argentina, and serving at a community center supporting under-resourced children. Ross has interned at the Consulate of Mexico in St. Paul, Minnesota, and has traveled in Argentina, Chile, Mexico, and Tanzania.

Kathleen O’Donovan is a paralegal for NIJC’s Immigrant Children’s Protection Project. Prior to joining NIJC, Kathleen was the manager for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program at HACES in Waukegan, IL. She also worked at the Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights as an AmeriCorp fellow where she mobilized volunteers, created ESL curriculum, and coordinated citizenship workshops. Kathleen received her B.A. from Kalamazoo College in anthropology, sociology, and Spanish. While in school Kathleen had the opportunity to study in Ecuador.

Carolina Ramazzina Van Moorsel is NIJC’s Asylum and Pro Bono Project coordinator. She graduated from Fundação Getúlio Vargas of São Paulo, Brazil with a law degree. Carolina is licensed to practice Law in Brazil, where she has worked in family law, community mediation, and governmental contracting. She earned her LLM from the Law School of the University of Illinois in Champaign Urbana, graduating with high honors. Before joining NIJC, Carolina worked as an advocate with La Línea, a hotline offering assistance to immigrants in the Champaign-Urbana area, and with Champaign County Health Care Consumers, which advances equal access to health care in the area. Carolina speaks French, Portuguese, and Spanish.

Diana Rashid is a Berkeley Public Interest Law Fellow and attorney working with NIJC’s Detention Project. She provides legal representation to detained immigrants in their removal proceedings. Diana holds a B.A. in economics and political science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and obtained her J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley School of Law. While in law school, Diana was part of the International Human Rights Law Clinic and coordinated the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) Legal Services Program for undocumented students at UC Berkeley. Prior to starting law school, she was a community organizer with the East Bay Alliance for a Sustainable Economy in Oakland. Diana is licensed to practice law in the state of Illinois.

Jackie Reidelberger is a BIA-Accredited representative for the Immigrant Legal Defense Project and LGBT Immigrant Rights Initiative. Before joining NIJC, Jackie spent time in northern Mexico and Guatemala, where she studied economic development and social justice issues relating to immigration. Jackie graduated from DePaul University with a bachelor of arts in religious studies in 2007.

Mary Roche is a BIA-Accredited Representative with the Immigrant Legal Defense Project. She graduated with honors from Tulane University in 2007 with a bachelor of arts in Latin American studies and art history. Before coming to NIJC, Mary taught ESL at Poder Learning Center in Chicago. She has also studied and taught in Spain and worked as a citizenship volunteer.

Esperanza Rodriguez is the receptionist for NIJC’s office in downtown Chicago and helps to manage all administrative needs of the office. Esperanza has been working for NIJC since 1987.

Charles Roth is NIJC's director of litigation. He has appeared in hundreds of appellate matters resulting in more than 60 published Court of Appeals decisions, and has overseen the filing of dozens of amicus briefs at the Supreme Court and the Courts of Appeals. He was counsel of record in Ali v. Achim, 552 U.S. 1085 (2007) (Mem.) and Machado v. Holder, 130 S.Ct. 1236 (2010). He also has represented immigrant classes in Ramos et al. v. Ashcroft, 08 cv 8266, and Hmaidan v. Ashcroft, 258 F.Supp.2d 832 (N.D.Ill 2003). NIJC commonly litigates in collaboration with pro bono law firms, in which case Charles co-counsels in the case and provides technical and legal support.

Jennifer Rubio is a paralegal for NIJC's Immigrant Children’s Protection Project. She graduated from Augustana College with a bachelor of arts in sociology with a concentration in anthropology. She also received a post-baccalaureate certificate from Roosevelt University in their paralegal studies program. Before joining NIJC, Jennifer worked at Latinos Progresando where she was a BIA-Accredited Representative.

Jennifer Scarborough is a paralegal with NIJC's Immigrant Legal Defense Project. Prior to NIJC, Jennifer worked as a BIA-Accredited Representative with Catholic Social Services of Fall River, Massachusetts and also as an immigration legal assistant with Catholic Charities of Austin, Texas. Jennifer has studied social justice issues in Mexico, Rwanda, and Thailand. She holds a bachelor of arts in Spanish from Mars Hill College as well as a master of social work and master of divinity from Baylor University. She is currently a part-time student at DePaul University College of Law.

Alek Suni is a paralegal working with NIJC's Immigrant Children’s Protection Project. Before joining NIJC, he spent a year researching renewable energy policy in Brazil as a Fulbright Scholar. He has studied, worked, or volunteered in Brazil, China, Ecuador, and Nicaragua, and has interned at the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh and the Americas Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C. Alek graduated from the University of Pittsburgh with a degree in economics, a certificate in Latin American studies, and a minor in Mandarin Chinese.

Diana Tafur is a staff attorney with NIJC’s Immigrant Children’s Protection Project and the Asylum Project. She graduated from Florida State University with a bachelor of arts degree in English and political science. Diana obtained her J.D. from American University, Washington College of Law and is licensed in the state of New York. Prior to joining NIJC, she completed a year-long fellowship with Asylum Access in Ecuador representing refugees and asylum seekers.

Karolyn Talbert, associate director of legal services, provides leadership to NIJC’s Immigrant Legal Defense Project and NIJC’s Self Help Desk at the Immigration Court. She provides legal representation to immigrants in removal proceedings and in applications for immigration benefits. As a former Equal Justice Works Fellow, Karolyn specialized in representing immigrant victims of notary fraud. Karolyn is an active member of the American Immigration Lawyers Association and a frequent presenter on immigration law. Before joining NIJC, she was the attorney advisor for the Immigration Court in Chicago. Karolyn is a graduate of the University of Iowa College of Law and is licensed in the state of Illinois.

Trisha K. Teofilo Olave is a legal supervisor for NIJC’s Immigrant Legal Defense project.  Prior to joining NIJC, Trisha was a BIA-Accredited representative at World Relief-Chicago and Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston.  While at Catholic Charities, she supervised the Crime Victims Program, was the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) coordinator and the pro bono coordinator.  Trisha also worked as the senior legal assistant for a private immigration firm.  She has participated in the VAWA/U Visa collaborative in Chicago since 2005. Trisha graduated magna cum laude from Loyola University Chicago with an honors bachelor of arts degree in political science and minors in Spanish and international studies.

Tara Tidwell Cullen is NIJC's director of communications. She works with the media to tell stories about the need for fair and humane immigration laws, and oversees NIJC's website and online outreach, including the Immigrant Justice Blog. Tara previously served as the managing editor of Cultural Survival Quarterly and has been a freelance reporter and event organizer for a number of social justice organizations. She received a bachelor’s degree in journalism and international studies from Northwestern University and a master’s in media, culture, and society from DePaul University. Her writing on human rights  has been published by Change.org, Huff Post Chicago, The Christian Science Monitor, RH Reality Check, and Alternet.

Julia Toepfer is the marketing and communications coordinator at NIJC, where she raises awareness of and garners support for immigrants’ rights by sharing their stories through online and offline channels. Julia has worked in nonprofit communications and management for organizations in Chicago, Milwaukee, and Boston. She was a legal assistant for an immigration law firm in Boston, worked on a collaborative campaign to achieve in-state college tuition for immigrant students in Massachusetts, and worked on advancing human rights in Guatemala with the Chicago-based Health, Education and Relief Foundation. Julia attended Boston College where she earned a bachelor’s degree in English with a minor in Latin American studies.

Claudia Valenzuela is the associate director of litigation. Claudia represents non-citizens before the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) and the federal courts via removal defense, impact litigation and administrative advocacy. She is a 2002 graduate of DePaul University’s College of Law and is a former Equal Justice Works Fellow (EJW). Prior to her graduation from the DePaul, Claudia served as a legal intern for NIJC developing a program for outreach and legal services to Chicago’s Guatemalan and Salvadoran communities. Claudia is licensed by the State of Illinois.

Keren Zwick is the managing attorney for NIJC's LGBT Immigrant Rights Initiative and Adult Detention Project. Keren is Chair of the LGBT Committee of the Chicago Chapter of the American Immigration Lawyers Association and is a key contributor to the Chicago LGBTQ Immigrant Rights Coalition. Keren joined NIJC following two years of clerking for the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. While Keren was a law student at Columbia Law School, she successfully represented clients in the Sexuality & Gender Law Clinic in both immigration and civil rights matters. Before law school, Keren attended the University of Chicago and worked as NIJC's asylum project coordinator.  Keren is licensed to practice law in Illinois.